Letters

Letter to the editor

With the two suicides that took place on campus less than 30 days apart, I thought it is time we talked about depression. (Not implying that depression was the reason behind these suicides, although it is most likely.) Depression (or clinical depression) is a medical illness that causes a constant feeling of sadness or low mood (which can be overwhelming). It may be genetic or it may be caused by the death of loved ones, conflicts and other personal problems.

There are various theories that explain depression: depressed people are said to produce less serotonin, which is a hormone that is responsible for mood balance. Studies have also shown that the hippocampus (the small part of the brain responsible for memory storage) is smaller in depressed people, hence depressed people have trouble remembering places and happy memories and, unlike the un-depressed, they cannot access these memories to improve their mood.

Read more: Letter to the editor

Letter to the editor

I have always been perplexed at the reality that this university – for the greater part – remains somewhat non-progressive. I mean, think about it, the idea that student life hasn’t changed much in the last decade is sacrilegious to say the least. Culture remains the most dynamic aspect of society, and the evidence is largely at its acme among us, university students. You know, wiggle wiggle wiggle and stuff.

I love the concept of student leadership. I believe this is largely the greatest tool at a tertiary institution level to entrench the ideals of democracy. The idea that we are led and can lead our own as equals affected by each other’s decisions, is a unique condition many globally are willing martyrs for. Oh, the privilege. The freedom we so gratefully enjoy, yet one that bears much responsibility in its practicality.

Election week is always refreshing for me: it is not only a chance to see the new SRC candidates, but also a time to see the influence I have had on the leadership culture of my university. In simplicity, I have failed. Yes, we all have.

Read more: Letter to the editor

Comment: crime and punishment

Social media continues to be divided over UP’s Blackface scandal. The outrage was sparked by a picture posted on Facebook depicting two girls posing with what looks like Nutella smeared on their skin, and with pillows stuffed under their skirts to make their bums look bigger. Supposedly, this is what South Africa’s domestic workers look like.

Following the uproar, the picture has since been deleted, and disciplinary steps are being taken against the girls by UP. After initially stating that they would not investigate the case because they had not received a complaint, the South African Human Rights Commission (SAHRC) has since decided to launch an investigation on its own accord, while keeping a close eye on the outcome of the university’s disciplinary procedures.

Read more: Comment: crime and punishment

Letter to the editor

 

Following the Blackface scandal I am appalled by people’s insensitive reaction towards the matter. The fact that people were condoning and justifying these girls’ actions was shocking. People must understand that “black” is not a costume. The girls’ actions were dehumanising and demeaning. It is one thing to play dress up, but to mock the race, heritage and job (an earnest and dignified job) and livelihoods of our mothers, grandmothers and aunts, is not only racist, it is ignorant and inhumane. Not only is Blackface a visual equivalent of a racist joke, but it is part of a tradition of mocking and insulting black people.

Read more: Letter to the editor

Letter to the editor

 

We have underestimated the saying “ignorance is bliss” until recently. It is clear that some people in our so called “rainbow nation” are still ignorant when it comes to issues of race. We must say we are very saddened and touched by the picture which went viral on social media, where two female white students posed in domestic worker outfits, with black paint smeared on their faces and arms, as they posed with headscarves and padded bottoms.

This picture ridicules the current situation that most black women in South Africa experience and continues to reinforce racial stereotypes.

Read more: Letter to the editor

Flip Through Perdeby

Video Gallery