Entertainment

Spring reads: turn over a new page

CAROLYN HUGHES

The trees are changing, the days are getting longer, and temperatures are rising. If you have been looking for the prime moment to initiate some kind of change or growth in your day to day journey, then grab this new season by the handlebars and jump into the pages of a new start with these South African essential reads.

Samantha Cowen, one of South Africa’s most established presenters in daytime radio, gives readers an introspective look into the progression of alcoholism and the struggle and stigma that follows. Whiskey into Water delivers a perspective on alcoholism from the inside out and humanises the struggle with addiction from diagnosis to recovery. The autobiography is a thrilling read that will encourage an improvement in health of both body and mind.

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Shanique Beauty Beautique opens in Brooklyn

MICHAL-MARÉ LINDEN

Brand new to Brooklyn, Shanique Beauty Beautique is a peaceful and comfortable new salon on May Street. Officially open from 5 September, Shanique Beauty Beautique is managed by Shalini Sivlal, who is professional and welcoming.

The salon offers a variety of beauty treatments, including massages, waxes, tinting and nail treatments. They also offer male care packages that are designed to help with everything from skin to beards.

Sivlal prides herself on being a stockist of Kylie Lip Kits, as well as being the only Pretoria stockist of Huda cosmetics from London. Shanique Beauty Beautique is also the only salon that offers eyebrow microblading, a semi-permanent eyebrow make-up which is administered by a certified practitioner on Mondays and Fridays.

The salon is known for its “make-up parties”, which is a ladies’ night designed for testing make-up and socialising, as well as its frequent specials. Students customers of the salon will receive a 10% discount on all their treatments with the presentation of a student card.

Sivlal says she that she has already built up a good client base and is looking forward to welcoming new student customers to the salon.

 

Image provided.

A look at the overlooked: black female superheroes

AAISHA KALLIER

Whether you are a child, a teenager or an adult, there is a good likelihood that you have encountered at least one comic book in your lifetime. For some, comic books are a staple of their daily lives, vicariously living the lives of heroes, fighting crime and saving the damsel in distress. In some cases, we have brave phenomenal female superheroes saving the “don” in distress.

Through the years and the in-depth indoctrination of Hollywood, female characters were promoted to be seen as weak and unable to help themselves. Black female characters were a minority and it was almost unheard of in the mainstream comic book scene for there to be a black female protagonist.

A 1973 character called Nu’bia was initially depicted as Wonder Woman’s twin sister while being formed from black clay. She wields a magic sword that was the only weapon that could counter Wonder Woman’s magic lasso. She was later re-imagined as an Amazonian warrior with superhuman strength, agility and an enhanced intellect.

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UP brews brilliant beer

COURTNEY TINK AND HUVASAN REDDY

UP has a successful microbrewery that has consistently won awards at the annual intervarsity microbrewery competition hosed by South African Breweries (SAB). This year the competition took place from 9-11 September. Perdeby spoke to Carl Sandrock, a senior chemical engineering lecturer and part of the team that runs the microbrewery, about the origins of the microbrewery, the relationship between chemical engineering and brewing beer, and how the intervarsity microbrewing competition works. Since the inception of the competition in 2008, UP has won at least one prize every year.

Sandrock said that the original brewery was built using funds donated by SAB and was built by Prof. Mike Heydenrych of the Department of Chemical Engineering, along with Lawrence Comrade from Draymons’s Brewery. SAB donated about R30 000, which was “just to get the brewery going”, said Sandrock.

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How to spring when your bank balance doesn’t bling

CAROLYN HUGHES

If you are anything like the current temperatures in Pretoria, then you didn’t get the memo that spring will have sprung on 7 September. Perhaps you don’t want to spend your Spring Day with the rest of the student population, or maybe your bank balance is as empty as Springboks on a Tuesday night, but fear not, because help is on the way. Whatever your cup of tea, there is something out there for you.

If you usually spend your days cooped up in a student flat, then you might want to visit Pretoria’s National Botanical Gardens. The entrance fee will set you back R30 (or R18 on the presentation of a valid student card). All you need to bring along is a blanket, some snacks and a camera to capture your Spring Day memories. Just remember to clean up your picnic site before you head home. No one likes a litter bug.

Read more: How to spring when your bank balance doesn’t bling

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